Hip Replacement

HIP REPLACEMENT

MIS technique for doing bipolars
SUPERPATH  for bipolars

easier than others , can be converted to open by simply extending the incision
minimal blood loss
no tendon is cut separation of muscles only
no chances of post op dislocation
easy to learn than other MIS
less time consuming
Hip replacement is a surgical procedure in which the hip joint is replaced by a prosthetic implant. Hip replacement surgery can be performed as a total replacement or a half replacement. Such joint replacement orthopaedic surgery is generally conducted to relieve arthritis pain or fix severe
physical joint damage as part of hip fracture treatment. Hip replacement is currently the most common orthopaedic operation.

If your hip has been damaged by arthritis, a fracture, or other conditions, common activities such as walking or getting in and out of a chair may be painful and difficult. Your hip may be stiff, and it may be hard to put on your shoes and socks. You may even feel uncomfortable while resting.

If medications, changes in your everyday activities, and the use of walking supports do not adequately help your symptoms, you may consider hip replacement surgery. Hip replacement surgery is a safe and effective procedure that can relieve your pain, increase motion, and help you get back to enjoying normal, everyday activities.

There are no absolute age or weight restrictions for total hip replacements.

Recommendations for surgery are based on a patient's pain and disability, not age. Most patients who undergo total hip replacement are age 50 to 80, but orthopaedic surgeons evaluate patients individually. Total hip replacements have been performed successfully at all ages, from the young teenager with juvenile arthritis to the elderly patient with degenerative arthritis.

When Surgery Is Recommended

There are several reasons why your doctor may recommend hip replacement surgery. People who benefit from hip replacement surgery often have:

  • Hip pain that limits everyday activities, such as walking or bending
  • Hip pain that continues while resting, either day or night
  • Stiffness in a hip that limits the ability to move or lift the leg
  • Inadequate pain relief from anti-inflammatory drugs, physical therapy, or walking supports

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Author: Soneet Aggarwal