Bone Fracture

MIS surgery

A MUSCULAR PATIENT WITH A LONG OBLIQUE FRACTURE EXTENDING FROM SUPRaCONDYLAR REGION TO MID SHAFT,NAILING NOT A FEASIBLE OPTION, WITH LESS COMMON BLOOD GROUP.

DR SONEET TELLS HOW TO DO MIS WITH MINIMUM OF INSTRUMENTS AND MINIMUM OF TIME WITH LITTLE BLOOD LOSS
All fractures can be broadly described as:
  • Closed (simple) fractures: Those in which the skin is intact
  • Open (compound) fractures: Those in which fracture is exposed.

Other considerations in fracture care are displacement (fracture gap) and angulation. If angulation or displacement is large, reduction (manipulation) of the bone may be required and, in adults, frequently requires surgical care. These injuries may take longer to heal.

Other types of fracture are:
  • Complete fracture: A fracture in which bone fragments separate completely.
  • Incomplete fracture: A fracture in which the bone fragments are still partially joined.
  • Comminuted fracture: A fracture in which the bone has broken into a number of pieces.

Anatomical Classification

An anatomical classification begins with specifying the involved body part.
  • Skull fracture - A skull fracture is a break in one or more of the eight bones that form the cranial portion of the skull, usually occurring as a result of blunt force trauma.
  • Rib fracture - A rib fracture is a fracture in one of the bones of the rib cage. The first rib is rarely fractured because of its protected position behind the collarbone. The most commonly fractured ribs are the 7th and 10th. Fractures usually occur from direct blows or from indirect crushing injuries. Rib fractures are usually quite painful because the ribs have to move to allow for breathing.
  • Shoulder fracture - The human shoulder is made up of three bones: the collarbone, the shoulder blade and the upper arm bone. Shoulder fractures include: Clavicle fracture, Scapular fracture and  humerus fracture
  • Arm fracture - The arm consists of 3 major bones. The humerus runs from the shoulder to the elbow. This is called the upper arm, or, simply, the arm. At the elbow, the humerus connects with 2 bones: the radius and the ulna. These bones go from the elbow to the wrist and are regarded as the forearm. A fractured arm means that one or more of the bones of the arm have been cracked. This is a common injury occurring in both children and adults. 
  • Hand fracture - Fractures of the hand can occur in either the small bones of the fingers (phalanges) or the long bones (metacarpals). They can result from a twisting injury, a fall, a crush injury, or direct contact in sports.
  • Pelvic fracture - Pelvic fracture is a disruption of the bony structure of the pelvis, including the hip bone. The most common cause in elderly is a fall, but the most significant fractures involve high-energy forces such as a motor vehicle accident, cycling accidents, or a fall from significant height. 
  • Patella fracture - A patella fracture is a fracture of the kneecap, which is one of the most common knee injuries. It is usually the result of a hard blow to the front of the knee.
  • Foot fracture - Approximately 10% of all fractures occur in the 26 bones of the foot. These bones comprise 2 bones in the hindfoot , 5 bones in the midfoot , and 19 bones in the forefoot.


Author: Soneet Aggarwal